Be wary of skin conditions during summer sports

Summer sports present new challenges for protection from skin conditions that can potentially affect athletic performance. Specifically, sunburn and skin cancers have become increasingly troublesome. 

The human skin constitutes the largest organ in the human body. It is designed to protect the body from harmful microbes. It also has a system of glands, nerves and blood vessels that allow the skin to regulate temperature.

The skin is divided into three levels: the epidermis, dermis and hypodermis. The epidermis is the outermost layer that provides a barrier against the elements. The dermis contains the sweat glands, hair follicles and connective tissue. The hypodermis consists of adipose tissue that insulates the human body. Blood vessels dilate and constrict to allow for cooling and warmth.

Chronic and acute exposure to harmful ultraviolet rays will result in skin damage. Acute damage typically appears in the form of a burn with reddening of the skin and blistering. This leads to pain and the blisters create the potential for infection.

Chronic exposure can result in skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans according to the American Academy of Dermatology. 

Basal cell carcinoma and melanoma may be prevented through the use of lotions containing an SPF (skin protection factor) of 30 or greater. Athletic clothing should have a UPF (ultraviolet protection factor) of 50 or more.

“Most skin conditions that come as a result of summer sports can be prevented if precautions are taken ahead of time,” reports Dr. Jennifer Pennoyer, a board certified dermatologist practicing at Pennoyer Dermatology in Bloomfield. “Anticipating potential exposure as well as regular skin checks can avoid a lot of anguish.”

Athletes rely on skin and sweat glands to regulate large variations in climatic conditions during workouts. Skin care can keep an athlete competing longer.

Dr. Alessi is a neurologist in Norwich and serves as an on-air contributor for ESPN. He is director of UConn NeuroSport and can be reached at agalessi@uchc.edu