Patellar tendon injuries are more common than you think

Dustin Fowler recently made his major league debut in the outfield for the New York Yankees. Unfortunately, his appearance was cut short when he ran into a wall trying to make a play. As a result, he suffered an open rupture of his patellar tendon requiring urgent surgery and months of rehabilitation.

Although rupture is uncommon, injuries to the patellar tendon are often seen in athletes. The patellar tendon is the principal connection between the patella (knee cap) and the tibia. The fact that it connects two bones actually makes it a ligament by definition.

The quadriceps tendon attaches the quadriceps muscle to the patella. Together with the patellar tendon, it plays a crucial role in the extensor mechanism of the knee. This provides stability when the leg is straightened. Weakness and swelling from sprain or rupture will result in a loss of power when extending the leg and potentially the leg collapsing.

Early symptoms include knee pain that worsens with any exertion. This increasing discomfort is often a warning to an impending rupture. An athlete should begin a regimen of rest, ice and possibly anti-inflammatory medications. If the inflammation becomes chronic the tendon will lose elasticity over time and lead to tearing and rupture.

“Common scenarios for injury include: a misstep when going downstairs, stepping into a hole unexpectedly, or slipping on wet grass in which one leg has to sustain body weight,” states Dr. Cory Edgar, Assistant Professor of Orthopedics at the University of Connecticut and Head Team Physician at the Coast Guard Academy.

“The good news is rupture of the patellar tendon is very easy to repair surgically but requires 3-6 months of recovery during which the first 2-3 weeks are very limiting.”

In the case of Dustin Fowler, the rupture was the result of direct trauma without warning signs. Careful attention to knee pain on exertion can avoid serious injury.

Dr. Alessi is a neurologist in Norwich and serves as an on-air contributor for ESPN. He is director of UConn NeuroSport and can be reached at agalessi@uchc.edu